Linden Groves at the Landscape Institute Awards in November, to publicise the Society’s CMP project

Posted on March 18th, 2013 by Charles Boot

Bibliography of Conservation Management Plans looks set to be a big hit…

Linden Groves is busy carrying out an English Heritage funded project for Society to produce a readily available reference list of Conservation Management Plans (CMPs) relating to historic landscapes in the UK, and where to access them. Good news, we now have well over 400 entries, with contributors ranging from ‘big name’ landscape practices, to small one-man bands, as well as County Gardens Trusts and national heritage organisations. The landscapes themselves are a fabulous mix of 18th-century park, municipal urban recreation space, private garden, interesting cemeteries and much more.

For a small sample of the CMPs received so far, please click here.

It is hoped that we can keep the list updated in future but the first stage will see publication later this spring, a milestone which is expected to be of great use to researchers.

Linden Groves at the Landscape Institute Awards in November, to publicise the Society’s CMP project

Linden Groves at the Landscape Institute Awards in November, to publicise the Society’s CMP project

Dr Marion Harney, Director of Studies running the MSc Conservation of Historic Gardens and Cultural Landscapes (University of Bath) has commented that, ‘A huge amount of research is needed to prepare a plan and many heritage assets have a long history of reports, historical or scientific accounts, or other documentation including collections and archives which are all brought together during the CMP process.

In order to understand the heritage asset CMPs describe how it has changed over time, from the earliest period to the present day using documentary research, archival information, historical maps and plans, archaeological information, oral history and field observations. These include published or unpublished sources, guidebooks or reports and the location of important sources of information, making them an invaluable resource to students, researchers and all those interested in understanding why our heritage is important and to whom it matters.

This exciting project to make CMPs available and accessible will enable everyone interested in their heritage to participate in looking after our heritage assets for future generations and is worthy of the support of us all.’

We are continuing to welcome entries up until the end of March 2013 so, whether you are a CMP author, a property owner, or just happen to have one sitting on your shelf, do please contact Linden.


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